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How to Take Care of New Dentist Braces

How to floss with braces
Oral Hygiene - It is very important to keep your teeth, gums and appliances absolutely clean throughout your treatment. At least twice a day, spend a few moments with a mirror checking the appliances to make sure they are thoroughly clean and in good shape.

Eating - Be careful to protect your appliances when you eat. The first few days, soft foods will be the best to eat. Throughout your treatment, avoid foods such as: tough meats, hard breads, nuts, sticky foods, gum, popcorn, ice, corn, chips, corn-on-the-cob, whole apples, uncooked carrots, sweets.

Loosening of Teeth - It is normal for your teeth to loosen during treatment. They must, so that the teeth can begin to move to their new position.

Loose Wire, Band or Bracket- Sometimes a wire, band or bracket may come loose. If a wire protrudes and becomes irritating, it can be turned down with a blunt instrument like a pencil eraser or a spoon until repaired. Also, try using wax to cover the tip of the wire, band or bracket that is bothering you. Please call our office if you need assistance.

Soreness - A few days after the braces are placed, there might be a general soreness in your month. This discomfort can be relieved by rinsing the mouth with warm salt water or taking Tylenol or other pain relievers. This soreness is expected and will soon go away. As a general rule, an emergency appointment may be made if there is something sticking out that you cannot take care of. Call our office as soon as a problem arises. It will be helpful if you can describe the loose or broken part.

What's What?

Braces are orthodontic appliances custom designed by your orthodontist to realign your teeth to a more desirable position in your mouth or to correct other mouth and jaw imperfections. Make your treatment process easier and more effective by learning the names of components necessary to make the the process happen. This will make it easier for you to discuss problems that arise with us.

1. Archwire- The main wire that acts like a track along which the teeth are guided.

2. Brackets- Metal or ceramic devices having a center track designed to hold the archwire.

3. Direct Bonding- The bracket is cemented directly to the tooth surface.

4. Buccal Tubes- Attached to the bands on molars to hold the end of the archwire safely in place.

5. Bands- These are cemented in place to encircle the tooth and are attached to the brackets.

6. O-Ring- Used to hold the archwire in the bracket grooves.

7. Elastics- Elastic or rubber bands are sometimes attached to hooks on the band and used to exert a pulling force from upper to lower teeth.

8. Hooks- These are sometimes added to the bands or to the archwire for attaching the elastics.

9. Tie Wire- A twisted wire that may be used instead of O-ring to hold the archwire in the bracket grooves.

10. Head Gear Tube- Tube that the inner bow of the headgear fits into.

Your Role In This Process
It is important for you to do your part in making treatment a success. The following list contains a few helpful hints to progress your treatment.

Follow all directions faithfully. Ask questions if you do not understand. It will be easier to follow directions if they make sense to you. Keep all appointments. They are spaced to give you the best results. Expect some minor discomfort and discuss with us in advance the best ways of dealing with it.

Success and quick results depend more on you than anyone else.

Elastic Wear
Elastic bands move teeth by exerting a constant force on the teeth which need to be moved. If you do not wear the elastics as instructed, the treatment will be less effective. Here are some basic rules for elastics:

Do not run out of elastics! Make sure you have plenty before you leave our office. Keep them with you at all times so that if one breaks, you can replace it immediately to continue the "moving force". Do not substitute a different size. We have provided the size elastic you need for optimal treatment. Change elastics twice a day or as we have instructed you.

Palatal Appliance Wear
The palatal appliances are used to widen the arch of the mouth and to improve the bite. You may feel an itchy sensation at the bridge of your nose and the roof of your mouth. This sensation means that the appliance is working, and it should go away very quickly.

After the orthodontist has cemented the appliance into place, you may be responsible for activating it as we have instructed you. When activating the appliance, always follow these rules:

Always ask someone to help you with your adjustment Loop the string (attached to the key) around finger. This is to keep you from swallowing the key! Insert the key into the hole in the center of the appliance and push the hole toward the back of the mouth. Do not turn key toward the front of the mouth! Carefully remove the key from the hole. Do not turn the key forward as you remove it from your mouth. Always keep the appliance clean. After eating, thoroughly rinse with water or mouthwash to remove food particles caught between the appliance and your palate. Using a waterpik (or something similar) in addition to brushing helps the cleaning process.

Brush, Brush and Then Brush Some More
This is more important than ever because the appliances you are wearing trap tiny particles of food and can contribute to an increase in tooth decay, plaque build-up and bad breath. Always brush immediately after eating, and do not forget to brush thoroughly. If you cannot brush immediately after eating, rinse your mouth vigorously several times with water or mouthwash. A waterpik is great to use in addition to brushing.

Be sure to brush along and under the gum line at a slight angle. It is good to brush the teeth the way they grow. Brush the upper teeth down and the lower teeth up. Brush at least 3 minutes (5 is best). You must floss even though it is hard to do with your braces. A floss threader can also be helpful in holding the floss for those hard-to-reach places.

Use a dental mirror after cleaning to see if the cleaning was thorough. A red plaque disclosing tablet is a good idea if you have the time. This will show you if you have more brushing to do. A proxibrush is another tool that comes in handy for hard-to-reach areas.





What Really Causes Crooked Teeth

Thumb sucking baby and crooked teeth

Parents beware. Thumb sucking may be a cause of crooked teeth

While there is no guarantee that thumb sucking is going to do permanent harm to your childrens smile but it could play a small role. Nearly all of us hand our finger in our mouths at an early age. I know I did. My parents warned me that I would get buck teeth by sucking my thumb. That never happened.

Using your thumb as a pacifier is not the only thing that could keep your dentist busy in later years. It seems that some families may have a genetic predisposition to crooked teeth. Their oral development is otherwise healthy and there is enough room in the jaw for the teeth, but they grow in crooked. Wearing retainers and teeth braces can help pull the teeth into position as they develop so they will grow in straight. People aware of a family history of this problem may want to discuss it with their dentists to make sure their children receive early intervention.

Crooked Teeth May Be Hereditary
The causes of crooked teeth can include inherited traits, injuries to the mouth, and poor oral development. Over time, misaligned teeth can create problems with eating and speaking, and may cause jaw pain and discomfort. Treatment options usually involve an orthodontist, who can correct badly positioned teeth with dental hardware and surgery, if necessary. It may take several months to years to align the teeth, and the pient needs to be consistent about treatment for it to be effective.

In some instances, the jaw is undersized or oversized, which can create crowding or awkward spacing. This can lead to crooked teeth over time as the teeth struggle to fit in. Other problems with oral development, like a jaw twisted out of alignment, can also push the teeth out of position. Injuries to the mouth such as those incurred in an accident can be another cause, as can oral tumors that press against developing teeth.

Poor dental work is also sometimes associated with crooked teeth. If children need extractions or other procedures, they need to be performed with care and consideration. The dentist must think about the child’s long term oral development, and must use appropriate spacers and other devices to protect the teeth. Regular checkups are also important so the dentist can determine if a spacer needs to be adjusted or removed as the child’s mouth grows.

As mentioned earlier in the article, habits like thumb sucking, pushing at the teeth with the tongue, or chewing on objects like pacifiers can also contribute to crooked teeth. Children may use these habits for comfort under stress. Long-term persistence of these habits can cause problems with oral development.

Three Main Reasons To Get Dentist Braces

Severly misaligned teeth on teenage boy
Getting dentist braces used to be something every child wanted to avoid. The advancement in dental technology and different styles of braces has helped reduce the embarrassment associated with braces. In fact, there are even a style of braces that no one can even tell your wearing.

Many Celebrities Wear Braces
Having braces is now considered hip in many circles. Even Justin Beiber and Selena Gomez wore braces a few years ago. Beiber was once spotted on the red carpet wearing what appeared to be Invisalign clear braces.

Look at all the rappers who wear those gold and diamond studded grills that look like dentist braces. I don't recommend you get braces just for show, but these are good examples of celebrities who consider braces cool to wear.

There are options like clear dentist braces that are hardly noticeable. Many of the clear type braces consist of a series of clear plastic aligners worn over the teeth for about six months to one year. Even traditional metal braces have been greatly improved in appearance and are considered "cool" among many children.

The various options for dental braces make it possible for both children and adults to pursue dental braces treatment. If you think you or your child might need braces, ask your dentist for advice or see a knowledgeable orthodontist. Here are the three signs that might indicate that you need dental braces.

1. Extra Teeth or Crowded Teeth.
Some people have extra teeth due to genetics, injuries or premature loss of baby teeth. Sometimes the mouth is simply too small for all the teeth, which creates the appearance of crowded teeth and/or extra teeth.

These conditions can make people feel self-conscious and prevent them from offering others a friendly, open smile. Fortunately, the extra teeth can be gently moved into their right places with dental braces. Sometimes the orthodontist will remove the extra teeth before applying the braces.

2. Misaligned Teeth.
While some people are born with perfectly aligned teeth, most of us are not so fortunate. Many people have spaces between teeth and some teeth that appear to be situated higher or lower than other teeth. Depending on the extent of the aesthetic impact and your personal preferences, dental braces can be used to achieve a perfectly even teeth alignment. If you have been thinking about braces, ask your dentist whether you might be a metal braces or Invisalign candidate.

3. Improper Bite.
An improper bite is created when the upper and lower jaws are in anatomically incorrect positions. Sometimes the upper jaw is set too far back, resulting in the upper and lower teeth touching when the mouth is closed. While this condition might be benign, in some people it can lead to the development of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ).

Prominent signs of TMJ are jaw pain, difficulty chewing, a clicking sound when opening and closing the mouth, and persistent tension in the jaw and temporal lobe areas. If you experience these symptoms, ask your orthodontist to evaluate you for TMJ. If you are diagnosed with TMJ, one of the treatment options might be braces to move your dental structures into the right position and relieve the discomfort.

Dentist Braces - Marketing Ideas For New Dentists

custom dentist braces for teens

Promotional Ideas For Dentists and Orthodontists

The next generation of Dentist Braces have arrived. Well not quite yet. But I'm sure after reading this article some inventive Dentist or Orthodontist will see the potential market for using dental braces as another way to advertise.

Imagine being able to use your dental braces to advertise your name or the name of your favorite sports team. What if each dental bracket could have a letter or symbol emblazoned on it to spell out a name. Sort of like a tattoo for your braces.

Imagine the possibilities. For example if your name is Joan you would have each bracket emblazoned with a letter to form the word JOAN. Starting on the top teeth you put "J" on one bracket, "O" on second bracket, "A" on third bracket, and "N" on the fourth bracket. When you smile it spells out the word JOAN.

How Dentist Braces Can Help Your Business
There are a number of possibilities to promote yourself or your favorite club or school. It even opens up the possibility for a company to pay a patient to use their smile as a form of advertising by having their company or product advertised on your braces. You could become a walking, talking Billboard for the product or service.

A word of caution: If you never smile or always seem angry at the world, this might not be the job for you. In order for people to see your snappy new mouth monogram you need to smile and wear it proudly.

Dentists and Orthodontists could entertain reducing the cost of the braces to each patient who agrees to have the name of their dental practice inscribed on the braces for a given period of time. I'm not sure the idea of smile advertising is even practical. There could be a number of reasons that would prevent the practice of placing anything on a dental bracket. That's a question to ask your Dental Provider.

Dentist Braces - How to Fix Crooked Teeth

Blue Dentist Braces for Adults and Kids
Dentist Braces Can Fix Crooked and Misaligned Teeth.
More people are wearing Orthodontic dentist braces than ever. In the past, many people didn't want to wear braces thinking it made them look like a nerd.

Braces are now more affordable and easier to wear. Advancements in Dentistry has made dentist braces more appealing, more comfortable, and the cost of dentist braces is more reasonable.

Average Cost Of Dental Braces

Kid with money in mouth
How much do Dentist Braces Cost the Patient? 
Average cost of dentist braces for comprehensive treatment range from $2,000 for children and $5,354 for adult braces. The average cost of braces is for both the upper and lower teeth and entails two years of treatment. This will vary slightly depending on the specific service that you might require.

Average cost that you will have to pay for orthodontic braces will vary depending on several factors:

1. Severity of the problem
2. Time needed for the overall treatment
3. Cost of dental braces also varies by location and from one orthodontist to the other.

Normally the cost of teeth braces for adults are around $5,000 but it is worth every cent the way you will look long after your orthodontic braces are removed. Your teeth will be aligned and straight using the latest technology. However, what you end up finally paying is determined by what condition your teeth are in and how badly their position affects chewing and speaking.

If you do not have dental insurance or a health plan that covers dental services there a dental schools that offer free or reduced cost orthodontic treatment. Check the List of Dental Colleges in your area to see which dental school offers free dental services or call the American Dental Association at 312-440-2500.

Dental Schools Offer Reduced Fees for Orthodontic Care

Dental School instructor installing braces
Dental Colleges That Offer Affordable Treatment.
Dental work can be expensive and beyond the budget of many Americans. If you can't afford Dental treatment one of your best solutions would be to investigate being treated at a dental school in your area. 

Dental Schools fees are generally significantly less than those of private offices and you will receive dental care that meets or exceeds generally accepted standards. 

Dental students work under the direct supervision of licensed dental faculty members and includes highly skilled Dentists and Orthodontists.

Types of Services Performed 
Most of the schools offer affordable treatment options and provide standard dental care as well as care in the specialist areas of orthodontics (dentist braces), pediatric dentistry (children's dentistry), endodontics (root canal therapy), periodontics (gum disease, implants), oral surgery (extractions) and prosthetics (complete and removable partial dentures, crowns, bridges).

If the list of Dental Schools below does not have a school near you call the American Dental Association at 312-440-2500 for information on a Dentist near you who provides free or reduced cost dental treatment.

List of Dental Colleges in the United States with information on how to register to become a patient at reduced fees:


Alabama

  • University of Alabama School of Dentistry, Birmingham

Arizona

  • Arizona School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Mesa
  • Midwestern University College of Dental Medicine, Glendale

California

  • Loma Linda University School of Dentistry, Loma Linda
  • UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles
  • University of California at San Francisco School of Dentistry, San Francisco
  • University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, San Francisco
  • University of Southern California the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry, Los Angeles
  • Western University of Health Sciences College of Dental Medicine, Pomona

Colorado

  • University of Colorado Denver School of Dental Medicine, Aurora

Connecticut

  • University of Connecticut Health Center School of Dental Medicine, Farmington

District of Columbia / Washington, D.C.

  • Howard University College of Dentistry

Florida

  • Nova Southeastern University College of Dental Medicine, Ft. Lauderdale
  • University of Florida College of Dentistry, Gainesville

Georgia

  • Georgia Health Sciences University College of Dental Medicine, Augusta, Georgia

Illinois

  • Midwestern University College of Dental Medicine, Downers Grove
  • University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry, Chicago
  • Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine, Alton

Indiana

  • Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indianapolis

Iowa

  • University of Iowa College of Dentistry, Iowa City

Kentucky

  • University of Kentucky College of Dentistry, Lexington
  • University of Louisville School of Dentistry, Louisville

Louisiana

  • Louisiana State University School of Dentistry, New Orleans

Maryland

  • University of Maryland at Baltimore School of Dentistry, Baltimore

Massachusetts

  • Boston University Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston
  • Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston
  • Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Boston

Michigan

  • University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor
  • University of Detroit Mercy School of Dentistry, Detroit

Minnesota

  • University of Minnesota School of Dentistry, Minneapolis

Mississippi

  • University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Dentistry, Jackson

Missouri

  • University of Missouri - Kansas City School of Dentistry, Kansas City

Nebraska

  • University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Dentistry, Lincoln, Nebraska
  • Creighton University School of Dentistry, Omaha

Nevada

  • University of Nevada at Las Vegas School of Dental Medicine, Las Vegas

New Jersey

  • University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey - New Jersey Dental School, Newark

New York

  • Columbia University College of Dental Medicine, New York City
  • New York University College of Dentistry, New York City
  • State University of New York at Buffalo School of Dental Medicine, Buffalo, NY
  • State University of New York at Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine, Stony Brook, NY

North Carolina

  • University of North Carolina School of Dentistry, Chapel Hill, N.C.
  • East Carolina University School of Dental Medicine, Greenville, N.C.

Ohio

  • Ohio State University College of Dentistry, Columbus
  • Case School of Dental Medicine - Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland

Oklahoma

  • University of Oklahoma College of Dentistry, Oklahoma City

Oregon

  • Oregon Health & Science University School of Dentistry, Portland

Pennsylvania

  • Maurice H. Kornberg School of Dentistry (Temple University), Philadelphia
  • University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia
  • University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, Pittsburgh

Puerto Rico

  • University of Puerto Rico School of Dentistry, San Juan

South Carolina

  • Medical University of South Carolina College of Dental Medicine, Charleston

Tennessee

  • University of Tennessee College of Dentistry, Memphis
  • Meharry Medical College School of Dentistry, Nashville

Texas

  • Baylor College of Dentistry, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Dallas
  • University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas
  • The Dental School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio

Utah

  • Roseman University of Health Sciences College of Dental Medicine, South Jordan, Utah
  • University of Utah School of Dentistry, Salt Lake City, Utah

Virginia

  • Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry, Richmond
  • Old Dominion University School of Dental Hygiene, Norfolk

Washington

  • University of Washington School of Dentistry, Seattle

West Virginia

  • West Virginia University School of Dentistry, located in Morgantown and Charleston

Wisconsin

  • Marquette University School of Dentistry in Milwaukee